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Level 3 Case Study: Dan Daley

Meet Dan Daley, who shares his Level 3 journey and how his coaching has developed throughout the award.

I have been lucky enough to be involved in the outdoor industry throughout my career…

This has allowed me to get out, paddle and coach full time. I was previously based at Lee Valley White Water Centre as the Paddlesport Manager, which is where I started my British Canoeing Level 3 journey. Since completing my British Canoeing Level 3 Award, I now work as a full time freelance coach.

I do most of my paddlesport coaching in the moderate white water environment with people looking to take techniques and apply them skillfully. Since completing my British Canoeing Level 3, my coaching has developed onto using structured annual development plans to help individuals long-term paddler journeys and ongoing development. I have also found myself spending more time in a range of disciplines within paddlesport. These are disciplines I have previously been involved with but through the award feel I have developed the skills to be able to aid individuals development. These disciplines include Freestyle, Slalom, Raft Racing and OC1.

Outside of a white water environment, the award has driven me to follow a path in coach education.

The Level 3 is a journey that allows you to develop your knowledge through the guidance of a mentor…

…While working with a number of coaches for peer and professional development. I believe the correct mentor is crucial to the learning, development and enjoyment of the aspirant British Canoeing Level 3. It is this mentor that can inspire and encourage the individual to succeed and develop. I found that the award not only broadened my knowledge base but also allowed me to meet other coaches within the British Canoeing system along with other sports and in turn generated more opportunities for my own development. I enjoyed the freedom of the British Canoeing Level 3 award that allowed you to work with your own learners, in the environments you feel best suits their long term development needs.

I also enjoyed the award pushing you to undertake your own research into areas you need development to best assist your learners, be it through reading around subject areas or attending courses to further your knowledge. I feel an important realisation through the award is that you are not going to be the best person for every aspect the learner needs and promotes guiding them onto seeking additional support in required areas.

The award has pushed me to focus on the long term paddler development…

…Rather than utilising quick fixes. I find it important to build the foundations correctly and not rush to achieve the outcomes.

I have found that using plans and goal setting within a learner focused environment allows the individuals to know where they stand with their development and be confident where they are within their journey to achieving their agreed goals.

Throughout the award I have seen my coaching spread across the physical, psychological, technical or tactical needs of my learners. Since the award, I have continued to develop my knowledge in the tactical and psychological areas of coaching, which I feel, are often overlooked.

 

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Welcome to Flatsome

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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Just another post with A Gallery

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A Simple Blog Post

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11 Impossible Tech Interview Questions You Don't Want To Be Asked

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song. But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour..

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

You can disable the auto-play option for newsfeed videos when you’re on a cellular network by going in to the Facebook app and tapping the options button (the three horizontal lines on top of each other) found on the bottom right for the iOS version, and towards the top right for the Android version. Then tap Account Settings > Videos and Photos > Auto-play > disable Smart Auto-play > and tap Use Wi-Fi Only.

Music and Video Streaming

Streaming music at the normal, average stream quality for an hour will use up 43 megabytes of your data plan per hour. It may seem insignificant, but it equates to about 1.3 GB of your plan per month if you stream music every day for an hour over your carrier’s cell network. Some streaming services stream music at a lower 64 kbps, which uses up less data.

And if you prefer to stream music in higher quality (at 320 kbps) when you’re not connected to a WiFi network, you’re looking at 144 megabytes per hour. That’s 4.32 GB per month if you stream high quality music every day for an hour over a cellular network.

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song.

If today were the last day of your life, would you want to do what you are about to do today?

But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour.

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

Read More

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You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song. But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour..

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

You can disable the auto-play option for newsfeed videos when you’re on a cellular network by going in to the Facebook app and tapping the options button (the three horizontal lines on top of each other) found on the bottom right for the iOS version, and towards the top right for the Android version. Then tap Account Settings > Videos and Photos > Auto-play > disable Smart Auto-play > and tap Use Wi-Fi Only.

Music and Video Streaming

Streaming music at the normal, average stream quality for an hour will use up 43 megabytes of your data plan per hour. It may seem insignificant, but it equates to about 1.3 GB of your plan per month if you stream music every day for an hour over your carrier’s cell network. Some streaming services stream music at a lower 64 kbps, which uses up less data.

And if you prefer to stream music in higher quality (at 320 kbps) when you’re not connected to a WiFi network, you’re looking at 144 megabytes per hour. That’s 4.32 GB per month if you stream high quality music every day for an hour over a cellular network.

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song.

If today were the last day of your life, would you want to do what you are about to do today?

But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour.

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

Read More

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You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song. But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour..

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

You can disable the auto-play option for newsfeed videos when you’re on a cellular network by going in to the Facebook app and tapping the options button (the three horizontal lines on top of each other) found on the bottom right for the iOS version, and towards the top right for the Android version. Then tap Account Settings > Videos and Photos > Auto-play > disable Smart Auto-play > and tap Use Wi-Fi Only.

Music and Video Streaming

Streaming music at the normal, average stream quality for an hour will use up 43 megabytes of your data plan per hour. It may seem insignificant, but it equates to about 1.3 GB of your plan per month if you stream music every day for an hour over your carrier’s cell network. Some streaming services stream music at a lower 64 kbps, which uses up less data.

And if you prefer to stream music in higher quality (at 320 kbps) when you’re not connected to a WiFi network, you’re looking at 144 megabytes per hour. That’s 4.32 GB per month if you stream high quality music every day for an hour over a cellular network.

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song.

If today were the last day of your life, would you want to do what you are about to do today?

But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour.

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

Read More

People Are Tweeting Their Rage At Scalia – But They're Making One Crucial Mistake

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song. But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour..

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

You can disable the auto-play option for newsfeed videos when you’re on a cellular network by going in to the Facebook app and tapping the options button (the three horizontal lines on top of each other) found on the bottom right for the iOS version, and towards the top right for the Android version. Then tap Account Settings > Videos and Photos > Auto-play > disable Smart Auto-play > and tap Use Wi-Fi Only.

Music and Video Streaming

Streaming music at the normal, average stream quality for an hour will use up 43 megabytes of your data plan per hour. It may seem insignificant, but it equates to about 1.3 GB of your plan per month if you stream music every day for an hour over your carrier’s cell network. Some streaming services stream music at a lower 64 kbps, which uses up less data.

And if you prefer to stream music in higher quality (at 320 kbps) when you’re not connected to a WiFi network, you’re looking at 144 megabytes per hour. That’s 4.32 GB per month if you stream high quality music every day for an hour over a cellular network.

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song.

If today were the last day of your life, would you want to do what you are about to do today?

But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour.

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

Read More

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You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song. But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour..

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

You can disable the auto-play option for newsfeed videos when you’re on a cellular network by going in to the Facebook app and tapping the options button (the three horizontal lines on top of each other) found on the bottom right for the iOS version, and towards the top right for the Android version. Then tap Account Settings > Videos and Photos > Auto-play > disable Smart Auto-play > and tap Use Wi-Fi Only.

Music and Video Streaming

Streaming music at the normal, average stream quality for an hour will use up 43 megabytes of your data plan per hour. It may seem insignificant, but it equates to about 1.3 GB of your plan per month if you stream music every day for an hour over your carrier’s cell network. Some streaming services stream music at a lower 64 kbps, which uses up less data.

And if you prefer to stream music in higher quality (at 320 kbps) when you’re not connected to a WiFi network, you’re looking at 144 megabytes per hour. That’s 4.32 GB per month if you stream high quality music every day for an hour over a cellular network.

You may purchase phone plans with more than enough data to cover things like casual web surfing and streaming the occasional song.

If today were the last day of your life, would you want to do what you are about to do today?

But you may not realize that browsing Facebook could be a big hit against your data plan too.

According to Cisco’s online VNI Services Gauge Tool, one hour of browsing through social media can use up 90 megabytes, which is more than twice the amount of data that streaming music uses in the standard “normal” quality per hour.

It means that if you spend an hour a day on social media over a cellular network, you could be using 2.7 GB of data a month. Even half an hour of daily social media browsing could consumer 1.35 GB.

A lot of that usage is likely due to the auto-play video Facebook recently added to its app. The videos appear at different rates for each user based on a variety of factors in Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm. Twitter is also said to have a similar feature coming to its feed soon.

Read More
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